Spending

The costs of cancer are divided into two categories:

- Direct costs include all the resources necessary for prevention, treatment and cancer care
- Indirect costs include resources lost due to inability to work

In 2014 the UK spent less on both cancer as a proportion of total health spend and on overall health compared to other comparable European countries.

Jönsson, B. Hofmarcher T., Lindgren, P., Wilking, N., Comparator report on patient access to medicines in Europe revisited, 2016. Available at http://ihe.se/en/publicering/cancer-medicines-in-europe-2

Jönsson, B. Hofmarcher T., Lindgren, P., Wilking, N., Comparator report on patient access to medicines in Europe revisited, 2016. Available at http://ihe.se/en/publicering/cancer-medicines-in-europe-2

Per-capita spending for cancer medicines

According to the international comparison cariedout by the Swedish Institute of Health Economics, the UK spend on healthcare as a percentage of GDP in 2014 was 1% lower and per capita spending on cancer was €41 lower than the Eurpoean average.

Despite a significant increase in spending on cancer medicines in the UK between 2005 and 2014, total cancer expenditure as a proportion of health expenditure did not increase. New treatments have in part allowed the NHS to realise savings elsewhere in the cancer pathway, including facilitating a move towards greater outpatient care and fewer days in hospital settings.

Jönsson, B. Hofmarcher T., Lindgren, P., Wilking, N., Comparator report on patient access to medicines in Europe revisited, 2016. Available at http://ihe.se/en/publicering/cancer-medicines-in-europe-2

Jönsson, B. Hofmarcher T., Lindgren, P., Wilking, N., Comparator report on patient access to medicines in Europe revisited, 2016. Available at http://ihe.se/en/publicering/cancer-medicines-in-europe-2

Direct spending on cancer

European data on direct spending for each cancer type is only registered in Germany, the Netherlands and the UK. Among the most common cancers, all three countries spend the most per capita to cover the direct cost of breast cancer, followed by colorectal cancer and prostate cancer.

Jönsson, B. Hofmarcher T., Lindgren, P., Wilking, N., Comparator report on patient access to medicines in Europe revisited, 2016. Available at http://ihe.se/en/publicering/cancer-medicines-in-europe-2

Indirect spending on cancer

The indirect cost of cancer across Europe between 1995 and 2012 has decreased by almost €240 million. The UK’s decrease in indirect cost of cancer has been even higher with €1billion fewer indirect costs. While expenditure on cancer has increased during this period, indirect costs due to early mortality have decreased. Innovative treatments have helped this trend, improving patient outcomes and reducing the burden of the disease on their lives.

"PPP = purchasing power parity"

Jönsson, B. Hofmarcher T., Lindgren, P., Wilking, N., Comparator report on patient access to medicines in Europe revisited, 2016. Available at http://ihe.se/en/publicering/cancer-medicines-in-europe-2

"PPP = purchasing power parity"

Jönsson, B. Hofmarcher T., Lindgren, P., Wilking, N., Comparator report on patient access to medicines in Europe revisited, 2016. Available at http://ihe.se/en/publicering/cancer-medicines-in-europe-2

Productivity loss due to premature mortality and morbidity

The majority of the indirect cost of cancer come from productivity loss due to premature mortality, which for all cancers amounts to €52billion across Europe.

Jönsson, B. Hofmarcher T., Lindgren, P., Wilking, N., Comparator report on patient access to medicines in Europe revisited, 2016. Available at http://ihe.se/en/publicering/cancer-medicines-in-europe-2